An introduction to the history of the car beetle volkswagen

This section contains content that is written like an advertisement. Please help improve it by removing promotional content and inappropriate external linksand by adding encyclopedic content written from a neutral point of view.

An introduction to the history of the car beetle volkswagen

Diesel[ edit ] InVolkswagen prototyped a 1. Volkswagen made only two of these naturally aspirated, air-cooled boxer diesel engines, and installed one engine in a Type 1 and another in a Type 2.

The bodywork attached with eighteen bolts to its nearly flat platform chassis which featured a central structural tunnel. Front and rear suspension featured torsion bars along with front stabilizer bar—providing independent suspension at all wheels.

Certain initial features were subsequently revised, including mechanical drum brakes, split-window rear windows, mechanical direction-indicators and the non-synchronized gearbox. Other features, including its distinctive overall shape, endured.

In fact, the Beetle was prized for its seemingly unchanged appearance and "marketed to American consumers as the anti-GM and Ford: We don't change a car for the sake of change. An engine oil cooler located in the engine fan's shroud ensured optimal engine operating temperature and long engine life, optimized by a thermostat that bypassed the oil cooler when the engine was cold.

Later models of the carburetor featured an automatic choke. Engine intake air passed through a metallic filter, while heavier particles were captured by an oil bath. Aftersteering featured a hydraulic damper that absorbed steering irregularities. Indicative of the car's utilitarian design, the interior featured painted metal surfaces, a metal dash consolidating instruments in a single, circular binnacleadjustable front seats, a fold-down rear seat, optional swing-out rear windows, front windows with pivoting vent windows, heating via air-to-air exchange manifolds operating off the engine's heat, and a windshield washer system that eschewed the complexity and cost of an additional electric pump and instead received its pressurization from the car's spare tire located in the front luggage compartment which was accordingly overinflated to accommodate the washer function.

Throughout its production, VW marketed the Beetle with a four-speed manual transmission. From and almost exclusively in Europe[53] VW offered an optional version of the Saxomat semi-automatic transmission: Subsequently, beginning in in Europe and in the United StatesVW offered an optional semi-automatic transmission marketed as Automatic Stick Shift and also called AutoStick ,[ citation needed ] which was a 3-speed manual coupled to an electro-pneumatic clutch and torque converter.

The convertible was more than a Beetle with a folding top. To compensate for the strength lost in removing the roof, the sills were reinforced with welded U-channel rails, a transverse beam was fitted below the front edge of the rear seat cushion, and the side cowl-panels below the instrument panel were double-wall.

In addition, the lower corners of the door apertures had welded-in curved gussets, and the doors had secondary alignment wedges at the B-pillar.

The top was cabriolet-style with a full inner headliner hiding the folding mechanism and crossbars.

Citation Information

The rear window was tempered safety glass, and afterheated. Due to the thickness of the top, it remained quite tall when folded. To enable the driver to see over the lowered top, the inside rearview was mounted on an offset pivot. The convertible was generally more lavishly equipped than the sedan with dual rear ashtrays, twin map pockets, a visor vanity mirror on the passenger side, rear stone shields, and throughwheel trim rings.

Many of these items did not become available on other Beetles until the advent of the optional "L" Luxus Package of After a number of stylistic and technical alterations made to the Karmann cabriolet, [56] corresponding to the many changes VW made to the Beetle throughout its historythe last ofcabriolets came off the production line on 10 January The rear window of the VW Beetle evolved from a divided or "split" oval, to a singular oval.

The change occurred between October and March The brake light function was transferred to new heart-shaped lamps located in the top of the taillight housings. The traditional VW semaphore turn signals were replaced by conventional flashing directional indicator lamps for North America.

Forthe Beetle received what would become one of its more distinctive features, a set of twin chrome tailpipes. Models for North America gained taller bumper guards and tubular overrider bars.Volkswagen’s Beetle is one of the oldest nameplates in automotive history still in use today.

In the U.S., the Bug was sold between and , with sales resuming as a new model was. The Volkswagen Beetle—officially the Volkswagen Type 1, informally in German the Käfer (literally "beetle"), in parts of the English-speaking world the Bug, and known by many other nicknames in other languages—is a two-door, rear-engine economy car, intended for five passengers, that was manufactured and marketed by German automaker.

Volkswagen sales in the United States were initially slower than in other parts of the world, due to the car’s historic Nazi connections .

An introduction to the history of the car beetle volkswagen

German production of the Beetle took place initially at the parent Wolfsburg plant until the Golf's introduction in , later expanding to the newer Emden and Hanover plants.

Rieger, Bernhard, The People's Car: A Global History of the Volkswagen Beetle. Harvard University Press, Ivan Margolius & John G Henry. Learn more about the history of the VW Beetle. One of America's beloved automobiles. Fusca or Cucaracha the Volkswagen (VW) Beetle economy car was manufactured and marketed by VW from until During the production period, 21,, cars were built, making the Beetle the world’s longest-running and most-manufactured car.

The Bug’s Life: A History of the Volkswagen Beetle Worth the Watt: A Brief History of the Electric Car, to Present What's Your Car Worth?

VW Beetle History | caninariojana.com